Water ScoreCard – A Data Tool for Businesses

When it comes to accessing the effectiveness of a water management strategies the Water ScoreCard – Tools for Businesses can be a useful tool for businesses.

The Water ScoreCard was initially created as a tool to help governments ensure better water quality, but many businesses are successfully using it to ensure their water management program is optimal. It is useful for any business that implements a water management program for sustainability and operates several different facilities.  The scorecard is a hosted program into which data about water usage is compiled and a company score is assigned based on the given information.  The Water ScoreCard can be used to:Water Score Card Guide

•  Create a snapshot of overall water usage across various facilities.

• Highlight facilities where water usage efficiency has been improved

• Easily locate facilities where improved efficiency in water management is needed.

• Compile data about water usage in cooling towers

• Quickly spread principles of water practices through staff

A guide to the Water ScoreCard was created in a joint venture between AT&T and the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) in order to help companies better understand how to create, understand, and manage the program.  The Water ScoreCard system has served to not only lighten the ecological footprint of business, but has allowed several companies to enjoy cost savings from reduced water usage.

The toolkit also contains easy-to-understand visuals about the importance of water and best practices in water efficiency at facilities.

To learn more about water reduction strategies and tools like the Water ScoreCard, please contact us at eco-officiency.

Sustainability Assessments: World-Wide or Within Your Company…It All Matters

World Leaders, environmental experts, and social and economic dignitaries attended the Rio+20 Conference held in Rio de Janiero this past June, producing a 49 page document entitled The Future We Want , detailing insights from the past, and outlining the future focus of Sustainability practices for our World. The Conference, officially known as The UN Conference on Sustainable Development (UNCSD), was the third in a series of United Nations collaborative assessments of the future of our planet.

In Rio in 1992, the Conference was called The United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED); ten years later, in 2002, in Johannesburg, World Leaders and invested participants attended The World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD). Sustainable development takes care of the needs of the present without compromising the needs of future generations, focusing on economic development, social development and environmental protection.

In June, the attendees committed to “working together for a world that is equitable, just, and inclusive, to promote sustained and inclusive economic growth, social development, and environmental protection to thereby benefit all.”

Are we any better off twenty years later? Have there been actual improvements to our World, achieved by the practice of green conservation, sustainable construction, and fair practice? Have we fed the poor and eliminated our need for fossil fuels? According to Rio 20+, “we” are working on it although not as far along as originally hoped.

We can see the activity around us: less plastic in throw-away water bottles, emission controls, re-cycling initiatives and practices, celebrity concerts to aid impoverished nations, and non-profit foundation hands-on training to eradicate hunger through sustainable farming and conservation practices. But the conference concluded that there have been set backs to past initiatives due to unrest, natural disasters, economic, food and energy crises around the globe. The following concerns were determined as primary focus points, in order to go forward:

  • Eradicating Poverty is the greatest global challenge facing the world today, an indispensable requirement for sustainable development.
  • Reaffirmation of the Rio Principles and Johannesburg Past Action Plans, including inter alia, the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities. Assessing the progress, as we strive toward the goals.
  • Mainstreaming sustainable development, by integrating economic, social, and environmental links.
  • Education toward the changing of unsustainable patterns of consumption and productivity in poorer regions, protecting and managing their natural resources, where their economy is usually based.
  • Re-assessing as new challenges emerge.

Sustainability assessments are not only the responsibility of World Leaders, Foundations, Celebrities, and Large Corporations. Individuals, in their daily life, and small to mid-sized businesses must make an effort to assess what they have done or need to do within their own environment to protect the future of our planet. There will be an eventual “tipping point” when even more will be accomplished, if we all do our part.

You can read the complete Rio+20 document in the link above, and contact us at eco-officiency for further planning ideas about what you or your business can do. We can help you assess the situation where you are, and achieve your sustainability goals.

It begins with a small step in the right direction.